Eliza Graves First Poster Gives the Twist Away, Rhymes for Young Ghouls Etches Its Scars Into the Back of Its Victim, The Art of the Steal Has a Scent of Now You See Me in It, Plus Asian International Sheet for All Is Lost and a Russian Poster for Thor: The Dark World

Posted: September 7, 2013 in Movies

afflicted

Afflicted (formerly known as Ends of the Earth) is a found footage horror film (go ahead and roll your eyes) that is playing TIFF 2013 as part of its Midnight Madness section.

The debut feature for  Cliff Prowse and Derek Lee, also its stars, is about a dream vacation to the end of the world that goes horribly wrong  (not like they go horribly right in horror movies) when a mysterious affliction takes over the entire body of one of them.  And creates some new abilities.

I sense a horror style superhero in the making in the inevitable sequels.

The poster is suitably brainy, weird and disgusting.

eliza_gravesThe first Eliza Graves poster delights in giving its big plot twist away.  

Kate Beckinsale stars as Eliza the heroine of Edgar Allan Poe’s famous short story The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether about a young doctor working in an asylum who slowly discovers that his inamorata and fellow colleagues are really the patients who have taken over the asylum.   Jim Sturgess stars as the naive young internist and Ben Kingsley, Michael Caine, Brendan Gleeson and David Thewlis are the wacky staff.   

Brad Anderson directs in his big screen debut. 

Arrives 2014.  

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The poster for Rhymes for Young Ghouls etches it disturbing theme and subject matter on the young back of its victim.  

Canuck film director Jeff Barnaby debut piece focuses an eye onto the abuse of Canadian Aboriginal children who were separated from their families.  The practice went on went on until the 1990s with state-run schools for Aboriginals only.

Fifteen-year-old Alia  is a Red Crow Mi’gMaq Indian  who is at the mercy of the hands of Popper, the sadistic Indian agent who runs the reservation’s residential reform school she is forced by government law to attend– St Dyphmas.  Popper forces Alia to hustle dope to pay a “trunacy tax” that allows her to avoid the brutality that is the school’s every day existence.  When her drug money is stolen, the precarious balance of her world is destroyed forcing Alia to either stand and fight or flee.  She has been taught that Mig’Maqs don’t run. 

Rhymes for Young Ghouls had its premier at TIFF 2013. 

art_of_the_stealThe TIFF 2013 poster for The Art of the Steal has a certain Now You See Me quality to it. 

The plot has a third-rate motorcycle daredevil and part-time art thief teaming up with his snaky brother to steal one of the most valuable books in the world.

A great cast featuring Kurt Russell, Jay Baruchel, Terence Stamp, Katheryn Winnick and Matt Dillon highlight this barely promoted oddity that’s getting dumped in the September sludge of problem production releases. 

Jonathan Sobol writes and directs. 

Opens September 20th. 

all_is_lost_ver2This Asian international poster for All Is Lost has a tranquil Japanese garden feel that will connect to its Asian audience.  The boat adrift in this sea of tranquility has an origami feel to it.  

Really, a very nice poster.  

thor_the_dark_world_ver8The Russian poster for Thor: The Dark World has the Norse god looking colder and grayer than usual. Russian audiences will  easily pick up on the red swirl of Thor’s cape which duplicates those seen in older style communist propaganda sheets.  The whole poster just has a proletarian feeling to it.  Those with Soviet era memories will either love it or hate it.  A good example of over tweaking a sheet for a particular audience.  

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