Archive for November, 2014


Star Wars: The Force Awakens Posters

When the Force Awakens as it did for the release of the first teaser trailer for Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens good things soon follow. If the greatness of a movie can be echoed by the vibrancy of its creative/artistic fan base, as in these four seriously cool posters, than the Force really has Awaken and it is just up to time and talent to cement the masterpiece label. Here’s hoping that J.J. Abrams film when it opens in December 2015 will be equal to its most avid creators.

Phil Noto

Phil Noto worked as a Disney animator for 10 years on such 2D animation features as Lion King, Pocahontas, Mulan and Lilo and Stitch. Frustrated with the way 2D was yielding to digital animation Noto switched to becoming a DC comics illustrator doing covers for Birds of Prey and working on Batgirl, Superman, Danger Girl, Beautiful Killer, Hellboy, Buffy, The Infinite Horizon, Avengers, X-23, Wolverine and Jubilee, X-Force and Thunderbolts.

See more of his work at:

https://twitter.com/philnoto

http://philnoto.tumblr.com/About

Lazare Gvimradze

Lazare Gvimradze is an amateur artist who lives in Georgia and doodles all his creations on his iPad.

Find more of his art at:

http://lazaregvimradze.daportfolio.com/

Orlando Arocena

Orlando Arocena is a member of the renowned Poster Posse. Arocena is a Mexican-Cuban-American who enjoys delivering creative solutions for some of the world’s most renowned Brands- while also pursuing his own artistic endeavors.

See more at:

http://www.mexifunk.com/

Charles Tan

Charles Tan is a Canadian based digital illustrator specializing in concept art, design, and visual development.

See more of his art at:

http://charlestanart.deviantart.com/

http://charlestanart.storenvy.com/

http://charlestan.tumblr.com/

Star Wars Art: Posters


Berlin Alexanderplatz," directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1980. Illustration by Eric Skillman
Berlin Alexanderplatz,” directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1980. Illustration by Eric Skillman
The discerning film fan knows that the Criterion Collection produces the most pristine, well-researched, feature pack classic, foreign and independent films on DVDs and BluRay. Criterion is celebrating its 30th year in business by producing a gorgeous coffee table book. Criterion Designs has a picture index of all its DVD covers and includes works-in-progress, alternate covers and cutting-room-floor drafts of the 100 original interpretations represented, like Rossellini’s “War Trilogy,” early Cronenberg, select Hitchcock, vintage Charlie Chaplin, the complete Wes Anderson and more.Peter Becker, the President of Criterion explains the company’s mission:

““Even when an impossibly iconic image already exists for a film, we usually like to start over, look for a new way to present it graphically,” he explains. “These films are not museum pieces. They are alive, and we want our designs to reflect that, so we turn to top contemporary artists to look at the classics of world cinema with fresh eyes and communicate their vitality to today’s audiences.”

John Cassavetes: Five Films, 1959-1977 Illustration by Lucien S.Y. Yang
John Cassavetes: Five Films, 1959-1977 Illustration by Lucien S.Y. Yang
“The Man Who Knew Too Much,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1934 Illustration by Bill Nelson
“The Man Who Knew Too Much,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1934 Illustration by Bill Nelson
Roberto Rossellini’s “War Trilogy,” 1945-1948 Illustration by Jason Hardy
Roberto Rossellini’s “War Trilogy,” 1945-1948 Illustration by Jason Hardy
Scanners,” directed by David Cronenberg, 1981 Illustration by Connor Willumsen
Scanners,” directed by David Cronenberg, 1981 Illustration by Connor Willumsen
“Sweet Smell of Success,” directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1957 Illustration by Sean Phillips
“Sweet Smell of Success,” directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1957 Illustration by Sean Phillips
The Complete Jacques Tati, 1949-1974 Illustration by David Merveille
The Complete Jacques Tati, 1949-1974 Illustration by David Merveille
“Zazie at the Metro,” directed by Louis Malle, 1960 Illustration by Yann Legendre
“Zazie at the Metro,” directed by Louis Malle, 1960 Illustration by Yann Legendre
Art by painter Caitlin Kuhwald
Art by painter Caitlin Kuhwald
Art print by Jaime Hernandez
Art print by Jaime Hernandez
Design by Frank Kozik
Design by Frank Kozik
Art by Paul Davis.
Art by Paul Davis.
Art by Manuele Fior
Art by Manuele Fior
Design by Sam Smyth
Design by Sam Smyth
Set of four limited-edition fine-art prints by Darwyn Cooke, featuring his artwork for the Criterion Collection Monsters and Madmen box set, which includes The Atomic Submarine, Corridors of Blood, First Man into Space, and The Haunted Strangler.
Set of four limited-edition fine-art prints by Darwyn Cooke, featuring his artwork for the Criterion Collection Monsters and Madmen box set, which includes The Atomic Submarine, Corridors of Blood, First Man into Space, and The Haunted Strangler.
Designed and handcrafted by the letterpress artisans at Yee-Haw Industries in Knoxville, Tennessee.
Designed and handcrafted by the letterpress artisans at Yee-Haw Industries in Knoxville, Tennessee.
Limited-edition fine-art print by Bill Sienkiewicz, featuring his artwork for the Criterion Collection release of Byron Haskin’s Robinson Crusoe on Mars.
Limited-edition fine-art print by Bill Sienkiewicz, featuring his artwork for the Criterion Collection release of Byron Haskin’s Robinson Crusoe on Mars.
Design by David Plunkert
Design by David Plunkert
Design by Steve Chow
Design by Steve Chow
Design by Steve Chow
Design by Steve Chow
Design by Sam’s Myth
Design by Sam’s Myth
Cover by Sarah Habibi
Cover by Sarah Habibi
Cover by Kate Zambrano
Cover by Kate Zambrano
Cover by Jillian Tamaki
Cover by Jillian Tamaki
Cover by Neil Kellerhouse
Cover by Neil Kellerhouse
Cover by Eric Skillman
Cover by Eric Skillman
Cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang
Cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang
Cover by John Gall
Cover by John Gall
Cover by Eric Skillman
Cover by Eric Skillman

Criterion Designs


A Lionsgate photo shoot- Gregory Zabilski NY Times

The Lionsgate marketing department only has 27 staffers. Tiny in comparison to other studios who usually devote about the same number to one big franchise film. Still with 1/3rd the resources of its Goliath counterparts it is able to out market its biggest rivals.

The secret: the Lionsgate marketeers are a scrappy, thrifty group devoted to doing everything in house. They don’t spend their money on big TV ads and campaigns, instead preferring to keep it intimate and cheap through the use of social media branding. They create content for YouTube, launch their own appropriate “fake” movie related websites and spread the word through related Facebook pages.

Also, the Lionsgate marketeers are very focus group and market research adverse. Decisions are made by funneling the most common sense ideas and just going with whatever their fine tuned movies instincts tell them is the best way.

The result is that The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, the third movie in the series grossed over $123 million during its opening weekend on an advertising budget of about $50 million. The big tent pole features for other studios usually spend twice that amount.

“It’s very easy to follow convention, and what Lionsgate has done with ‘The Hunger Games’ is an interesting case study about breaking convention,” said Ben Malbon, Google’s director of creative partnerships, in an interview with the New York Times.

Jon Feltheimer, chief executive of Lionsgate’s corporate parent, Lions Gate Entertainment, has long empowered Tim Palen, chief marketing officer, to make instinctive snap decisions. A New Yorker article called him “The Cobra”.

Palen is also a very good self-taught commercial photographer and often does the studios photo shoots and poster covers. His District Heroes posters are eloquent and beautiful and can be found here.

A Tim Palen District Heroes poster.

“Typically at a studio, you sit in marketing meetings and there are 17 proposed versions of a poster and sheets of data about how various proposed materials have tested,” said Francis Lawrence, who directed “Mockingjay” in a NY Times interview. “Decisions are data-driven and made by committee.”
He added, “You just don’t get that at Lionsgate.”

Palen’s Capitol Couture ads that pitched fake Capitol approved beauty products and fashions appeared on billboards and bus shelter through out Los Angeles and New York City earlier this year generating lots of cheap publicity for Mockingjay.

A Palen Capitol Couture ad

Lionsgate is also refreshingly free of legal advisers.

“At another studio, legal or standards or both would have stopped us 10 steps before we got any of those ideas,” Mr. Palen noted to the New York Times.

“We may be outlaws, but Jon Feltheimer is still the sheriff,” he said, referring to the chief executive of the studio. “He’s the reason I get to make moonshine.”

Another Palen Capitol Couture ad

On the social media side Palen partenered with Google to create a mock Hunger Games television network called Capitol TV, a fictional news source representing the government side of events. The series of fake Capitol documentaries called Capitol TV: District Voices were created by YouTube rising stars stars Justine Ezarik of iJustine, and Rob Czar and Corinne Leigh, of the do-it-yourself fashion channel ThreadBanger as well as Veritasium, Feast of Fiction, and fighTIPS.

http://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2Fvideoseries%3Flist%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrdevyQjnNAk%26list%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7%26index%3D1&image=http%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FrdevyQjnNAk%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=4346f5e0fac645ec8a30f75e92dc526f&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

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The Lionsgate marketeers went full force with the documentaries, trying to blur in the viewer’s mind the line between reality and fiction in an attempt to implant a strong Mockingjay memory by using actual Mockingjay actors, sets and props.

http://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2Fvideoseries%3Flist%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D19WhhFJOLyY%26list%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7%26index%3D2&image=http%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2F19WhhFJOLyY%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=4346f5e0fac645ec8a30f75e92dc526f&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

http://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2Fvideoseries%3Flist%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DRwa26CXG1fc%26list%3DPLMTks8IC-XXzpEKvAT9tJdXw_79Kc1P-7%26index%3D3&image=http%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FRwa26CXG1fc%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=4346f5e0fac645ec8a30f75e92dc526f&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

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“Lionsgate wanted to do something aggressive and pioneering, and it turned out that they actually were serious, which is not always the case,”noted Ben Malbon Google’s director of creative partnerships, in a New York Time interview.

The Hunger Games Movie Mockingjay Prop Rep Pin


UK movie magazine Empire went straight to the source, director Colin Trevorrow, to get the dish on all the great, nasty and beautiful dinosaurs and humans featured in the new Jurassic World trailer.

 

Every Jurassic Park movie has some know-it-all kids who eventually find themselves hip deep in all kinds of dinosaur do-do. In Jurassic World it’s Zack (Nick Robinson) and Gray (Ty Simpkins), a pair of Wisconsin kids on the field trip of a lifetime.

“Trailers are tough, you have to satisfy people who are looking for a reason to watch a new Jurassic Park movie, and younger people who didn’t grow up on it,” says Trevorrow of the decision to start the first Jurassic Park trailer in 13 years with characters rather than spectacle. “This movie has a lot of elements working together; it’s not just sci-fi terror. It’s not purely action-adventure. It’s not just funny or sad or romantic. It’s all of those things at once. Communicating that in two-and-a-half-minutes isn’t easy.”
And has the director been pleased with the reaction? “I’ve had people send me pictures and videos of their kids watching it. I see the look in their eyes, and I had that look once. I’d have to be pretty cynical to not be pleased with that.”

 

Jurassic World takes place 22 years after the events of the first movie. Every visitor to the park is ferried in by luxury boat. And just to underline the fact that dinosaur trouble will eventually happen– takes place on the same Isla Nubar of the original.

“It opened in 2005,” says Trevorrow of the fully-operational theme park. And InGen are out of the picture. “Masrani Global, owned by Irrfan Khan’s character, bought InGen after John Hammond’s passing with a very earnest mission to realise his dream. We have a website that details all that backstory. It will get more interesting as we get closer to June.”

 

The gate to Jurassic World has eagle-eyed fans screaming that it is all CGI. Little do they know they are 50% right.

“The gate is practical, the environment isn’t. That shot was made specially for the trailer. The film will be different.”

 

This gallimimus swarm are one of many homages to the original movie.

“We set it in present day, but we’ve taken some scientific concepts that are in the theoretical stage now and made them real. Kind of like the first movie – we couldn’t clone dinosaurs in 1993, and we still can’t. It’s just a more fantastic version of now.”

 

The gyrosphere is a hamster wheel that allows visitor’s to see the dinosaurs up close without becoming dinner. Jimmy Fallon is rumored to be the voice of one the narrated audio guides. Richard Kiley did the same honors in the original movie.

“Steven loves theme park rides,” says Trevorrow of the origin of the gyroscope. “He wanted to create a way for people to get up close and personal with the animals, to make it a self-driving, free-roaming experience. It loads on a track, but once you’re out there, you actually get to navigate around the valley.”

But, as we see later in the trailer, it would seem that the gyrospheres aren’t entirely dinosaur-proof. “I’m not sure what you’re suggesting,” laughs Trevorrow. “I see no way any of that could go wrong.”

 

The mosasaurus, Jurassic World’s new dinosaur gets the Shamu moment of the trailer when it jumps from its hidden depths to eat a Great White Shark whole. Trevorrow insists that he wasn’t referencing Jaws, executive producer Steven Spielbergs classic, when he did the scene.

“It wasn’t intended that way, however obvious it seems. The idea came out in one of our first meetings – I didn’t know if Steven and Frank [Marshall, producer on all the Jurassic Park movies] had considered an underwater reptile, so I pitched the mosasaurus and went off on the idea. I thought it would be cool if we had this massive animal and the park used one of our most fearsome modern predators as food. There could be a whole other facility where they used shark DNA to mass-produce them to feed the bigger beast. Steven gave me this look like, ‘You know I get it, right?’ And I sunk a little lower in my chair. And then he said, ‘Let’s do it’.
“It’s a bonkers idea, but I’m comfortable going to Crazytown, because I used to live there when I was a kid. Children have a creative fearlessness that I envy. If you’ve seen my first movie [sci-fi dramedy, Safety Not Guaranteed], you can see that I don’t mind embarrassing myself sometimes. As a result, my working relationship with Steven can feel like that Saturday Night Live sketch, Laser Cats. I walk in with so much confidence, then I look in the mirror and I’m wearing a tinfoil helmet. Half the time I feel like an amateur, and half the time he says, ‘No, wear the helmet. The helmet works.'”

 

Bryce Dallas Howard plays Claire, one of the head directors of Jurassic World, responsible for keeping the theme park attendance at an all time high. Her newest park addition is a “genetically modified hybrid”. Apparently, the sequels are doomed forever to repeat the mistakes of the original.

Fan controversy has erupted over this GMH/GMO. Why do the movies feel the need to create man-made monsters when nature has already gone through the trouble of creating so many great and awesome ones?

“There is no shortage of awesome dinosaurs,” he agrees. “We could have populated this entire story with new species that haven’t been in any of these movies. But this new creation is what gave me a reason to tell another Jurassic Park story. We have the most awe-inspiring creatures to ever walk the earth right in front of us, but for some reason that’s not enough. We’re not entertained. We’re always hungry for the next thing, and those who profit from it are always looking to feed that hunger. The focus groups want something bigger than a T-Rex. And that’s what they get.”

 

The first of many ominous looks exchanged between Bryce Dallas Howard’s Claire and Chris Pratt’s game keeper character Owen.

“They have a kind of old school combative chemistry,” says Trevorrow of his leads. “We haven’t really seen what those two people are like yet, the trailer sticks to moments when they’re at their most ominous and concerned. Owen and Claire are real people, and their relationship is a big part of this story. I’m not ashamed of putting a little sexual tension into my dinosaur movie.” Isle Nude-blar, anyone? Anyone?”

 

Chris Pratt’s Owen comes face to face with the first signs of trouble from Jurassic World’s GMH. Rumored name “Dominus Rex” or “D-Rex” for short. A leaked lego version (long since removed at the forcible urging of Universal Studios fringe enforcement patrol) of D-Rex has the mandatory killer dinosaur attitude conjoined with red demon eyes and a chameleon changing skin tone.

“Obviously I’d love to hold back as much as possible,” says Trevorrow. “But Universal has to introduce this movie to people all around the world, and in an era where we’re contending with superheroes and space epics, marketing has its own set of needs. We’re introducing a relatively new idea. No one under 25 has a memory of seeing the original Jurassic Park in a theatre. The last instalment was 14 years ago. We may see little pieces of her as we get closer – in fact, we already have – but I’m confident that we can keep much of that animal under wraps. She’s not the only danger. Far from it.”

 

The trailer’s biggest reveal is that the original enemy raptors are now tamed to the point of being near fre-nimys and are reliable enough to be part of the park’s security team responsible for keeping some of the nastier dinosaur tendencies in check and out of human harm’s way.

“I like that people aren’t sure what the hell they’re looking at,” he says. “I was concerned about putting this image in an early trailer, but I love that people are as excited about it as they are. It just reinforces that we all want to see something fresh. Those familiar homage shots in our trailer kind of mask how different this movie is from the others, and I’m relieved that people are embracing the new ideas.”
Still, the question remains: how can Owen be riding with raptors? “To not dodge the question entirely,” says Trevorrow carefully, “Owen’s relationship with the raptors is complicated. They aren’t friends. These animals are nasty and dangerous and they’ll bite your head off if you make the wrong move. But there are men and women out there today who have forged tenuous connections with dangerous predators. That’s interesting territory to me.”

Jurassic World Movie Poster 24″X36″


Interstellar Variant 2 by Edgar Ascensão.

There are two kinds of posters made nowadays.

The first is the regular theatrical release poster which tries to entice without revealing too much of the plot.

The second is the fan made, alternative poster which strives not only to encapsulate the entire plot and themes but also become a piece of art itself.

In the battle between commerce and art, art usually produces the better poster 3 out of 4 times. The geek fan of a movie, a fan with a bit of the creative impulse and a dab more of artistic ability can create some awesome things.

Commerce wants you to see the movie. The art poster wants you to see, love, breathe and live the movie.

Edgar Ascensão, a Portuguese digital artist, has gone beyond commerce to make the ultimate fan tribute poster for Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar.

For the non-fan Interstellar Variant 2 (as it is formally known and shown above) is a cool sheet filled with some absurd things. For the true fan, it reveals the secrets of the universe.

Some of those secrets are revealed in the spoiler and artist quotes below. There are for sure more. Feel free to reveal the other Interstellar verities you see in the comments section.

(Please forgive the artist for his imperfect command of English grammar and spelling.)

Spoiler:

There is the helmet, the Morse code and the fifth dimension stylized in the lines.
This poster is a huge spoiler? Perhaps, but just for those who didn’t see the movie, probably will not understand it. It’s too cryptic and taht’s the way it should be…
Below, the word STAY is written in Morse. Some details are meant just to be discreet.

Interstellar Variant 1 by Edgar Ascensão.

Spoiler:

Based on the relationship of father and daughter.
More of a minimal concept, it’s the connection between the space travel and Cooper’s watch.

Interstellar: The Official Movie Novelization

The Science of Interstellar

 

Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar: The Complete Screenplay: With Selected Storyboards (Opus Screenplay Series)


Call it a case of actor’s remorse. Even though Christian Bale had given up on the idea of ever playing Batman again, part of his soul sunk into a dark state when he heard that Ben Affleck had been chosen for the role of the Dark Knight in the upcoming Zack Snyder directed Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice.In an interview with Empire magazine Bale talked about the mixed emotions and frustrations he felt when he heard about Affleck’s Bat-casting:

“I’ve got to admit initially, even though I felt that it was the right time to stop, there was always a bit of me going, ‘Oh go on… Let’s do another.’ So when I heard there was someone else doing it, there was a moment where I just stopped and stared into nothing for half an hour.”

Bale still has trouble listening to his heart cry for the role while his head tells him to man up and get over it:

“But I’m 40. The fact that I’m jealous of someone else playing Batman…I think I should have gotten over it by now. I haven’t spoken with Ben, but I emailed him offering bits of advice that I learned the hard way. I would imagine he is doing everything he can to avoid anything that I did.”

No word about whether Ben Affleck ever e-mailed back with a thank you or advice of his own. Affleck undoubtedly will put his own unique stamp on the role and Bale will either love it or hate it, and probably comment on it- leaving us with two sad Batmen reflecting on the end of a good role.

 

Geek-Art: An Anthology: Art, Design, Illustration & Pop Culture


The average MoviePilot reader and creator represents only about 11% of all movie ticket audiences. According to an infographic released by Google and Millward Brown Digital (ABOVE) those who read and write movie blogs and religiously go to movies once a month only compose 1 in 10 fannies watching a film in a theater.

Interestingly enough, 68% percent (or 228.7 million) of all US and Canadians go see at least one film a year.

So how does the average moviegoer decide what film to see? Most moviegoers put three or four films they want to see on a mental wish list. The deciding factor in most cases: the most convenient start time.

The pre-theater decision making process does involve a lot of research. A little more than 75% use YouTube to watch trailers and get basic plot and cast info. A good movie trailer can bring in up to 39% of any given theater audience. That’s 3X times any other source. A great cast and a friend’s opinion persuade only 11% and 8% of moviegoers respectively.

Other deciding factors are the genre of the film. Folks with a flair for drama lean towards plot. Comedians are swayed by the cast. Gore Hounds go for the most convenient show times. Parents with kids are swayed by movie reviews, particularly thumbs up. Action Miesters go mostly by the director of the film.

For the advertisers and their commercials we all so love to watch it makes for an easier pitch. Dramatics are susceptible to other movie ads, online shopping and apparel advertising. Comedians are drawn to computer games, offbeat artsy stuff and soccer gear advertising. Horror-ifics are enthralled by offers involving consumer electronics, skate sports and soccer stuff. Parents and their kids like being enticed by comics, online shopping, apparel and weirdly enough listening to movie soundtracks, probably mostly Disney animated features. Action Jackson’s perk up with martial arts, home and garden and humor ads. The Big Franchise crowd goes for comics, crime and justice and martial arts.

Do you agree or disagree with these findings? Where do you fit into the movie going spectrum? Let me know in the comments.

 

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