captain-america-3Civil War is happening!

The MCU fan base is already starting to look past The Avengers: Age of Ultron to the next epic battle Captain America: Civil War. MCU fan art is also taking a stand. In the Civil War between Captain American and Iron Man fan artists are positioning Steve Rogers to the left of the political dividing line and Tony Stark to the right of the line.

Don’t put that much truth in that. The positioning is probably more of an artistic choice than a political one. The blue of Captain America’s uniform is on the left side of the Color Wheel. Iron Man red is on the right side. The blue and red of the Spiderman uniform puts Peter Parker or whatever character iteration that plays Spidey squarely in the middle. (Now you know the origin for the real blue state and red state used in political geographic maps.)

The one poster that radically inverts this color divide is Orlando Arocena’s Civil War homage filled with his trademark vector art work. I especially like the semi-Ultron suggestion in the Iron Man body styling. Arocena is not afraid of being blunt about who he thinks the real villain of Civil War should be. Red is the oppressive color. The blue scream and agony of Captain America’s skull crushing is exceedingly visceral and brutal.

Captain America: Civil War is scheduled to be released everywhere on May 6, 2016.

by jphomeentertainment
by jphomeentertainment

http://jphomeentertainment.deviantart.com/art/CAPTAIN-AMERICA-CIVIL-WAR-2016-517843952

by AncoraDesign
by AncoraDesign

http://ancoradesign.deviantart.com/art/Captain-America-Civil-War-Movie-Poster-491317843?q=sort%3Atime%20gallery%3AAncoraDesign&qo=0

by krallbaki
by krallbaki

http://krallbaki.deviantart.com/art/Captain-America-Civil-War-2016-Poster-492584212

by Enoch16
by Enoch16

http://enoch16.deviantart.com/

by AndrewSS7
by AndrewSS7

http://andrewss7.deviantart.com/art/Captain-America-Civil-War-teaser-poster-493247486

by sahinduezguen
by sahinduezguen

http://sahinduezguen.deviantart.com/art/Captain-America-Civil-War-Poster-A-494809851

by sahinduezguen
by sahinduezguen

http://sahinduezguen.deviantart.com/art/Captain-America-Civil-War-Poster-C-515361489

by Orlando Arocena
by Orlando Arocena

http://www.mexifunk.com/product/civil-war-18×24-edtion-50

by HeroforPain
by HeroforPain

http://heroforpain.deviantart.com/art/Marvel-Civil-War-363699710

by vic55b
by vic55b

http://vic55b.deviantart.com/art/civil-war-color-battle-318995009

51iu7WsW1kL

Marvel Comics Civil War & House of M Collectors Edition DVD-ROM Bundle


Dissection of Mickey Mouse
Dissection of Mickey Mouse
Art and comics seldom presents the visceral truth— the teeming mass of body parts, gelatinous substances and fluids that make up our bodies. The fairly obvious reason is that the body is covered by so much skin. Without an inside there is no outside. No thoughts or emotions or maybe even a soul.
Modern Art is not indebted to a photo realistic portrayal of the world. It can warp and slice what we see into visions of perceptions. That is why Picasso’s Nude Descending a Staircase or his other Cubist paintings attempt to portray a 360 degree reality step by step. It tries to represent the flow of reality in the geometry of the every-day.

Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"
Pablo Picasso’s “Guernica”

Picasso’s one great attempt to present a visceral reality resulted in the preeminent masterpiece of the 20th Century- Guernica. Guernica explodes outward with a gut wrenching precision that displays the horrors of war through an internal death scream. Everything in Guernica is dying from the inside. The agony of the destruction is obvious. There is no need to show the bombs or body parts. Our imaginations fills in the horror.

The Viennese street muralist Nychos tries to fill in the missing visceral existence. Dissection becomes a form of Cubism in his hands. Dissection presents the layers in a way that is horrifying , beautiful (and unlike Guernica) also colorful.

Nychos takes his scalpel to both the animal and comic book world. He concentrates on giving the mythology of Mickey Mouse, The Little Mermaid, TNMT a visceral reality, an extra dimension that tries to make them mortal by showing the internal squishy reality.

Dissection of  the Little Mermaid
Dissection of the Little Mermaid

Nychos dissections are not so much an attempt to destroy our childhood memories as they are an experiment to bring them in alignment with the real world.

Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT
Dissection of a TNMT

In Nychos human dissections, particularly Apocalypse Weird (below) which can be described as Nycho’s Guernica tribute, you can see the cubists influence.

Apocalypse Weird
Apocalypse Weird

Layered over the Picasso homage is another homage to the Mexican tradition of Dias Des Los Muertos (Day of the Dead). The dissections become multilayer Death Masques exposing all of human substance from muscles, organs, tissue and skeletons. The comic style rendering keeps the whole anatomy lessons from collapsing into revulsion and morbidness.

Bring Me Your Daughter to the Slaughter
Bring Me Your Daughter to the Slaughter
Dissection
Dissection
X-Ray Bob
X-Ray Bob
Dissection of Hunter S Thompson
Dissection of Hunter S Thompson

The animal dissections explore the notion that life and death coexist in the same space and time. Everything is awaiting its death, and its eventual immortality as a future discovered fossil or the dust under our feet.

Anatomy of a Flamingo
Anatomy of a Flamingo
Chicken Dance
Chicken Dance
Cross Section of a Doberman
Cross Section of a Doberman
Dissection of a Black Widow
Dissection of a Black Widow
Dissection of a Raptor
Dissection of a Raptor
Dissection of a Fox
Dissection of a Fox
Dissection of a Gator
Dissection of a Gator
Dissection of a Sperm Whale
Dissection of a Sperm Whale
Dissection of a White Rabbit
Dissection of a White Rabbit
Dissection of a Hammerhead Shark
Dissection of a Hammerhead Shark
Dissection of an Orca
Dissection of an Orca
Dissection of Mother Tiger
Dissection of Mother Tiger
Fleischwolf
Fleischwolf
Headache in Istanbul
Headache in Istanbul
Horsepower
Horsepower
Skeleton of a Doberman
Skeleton of a Doberman
X-Ray of a Doberman
X-Ray of a Doberman
X-Ray of a Wolf
X-Ray of a Wolf
Snake Bait
Snake Bait
X-Ray of the Artist's Name
X-Ray of the Artist’s Name

tumblr_n89w2iV4DW1rjgiijo1_1280

Nychos: Follow the White Rabbit


leonard_nimoy

 

The death of Leonard Nimoy deserves a memoriam not full of celebrity tweets and quotes but full of love, life and Spock in his own words.

So this tribute art to the greatest Vulcan who ever lived is also filled with the wisest thing he ever said as both Spock and himself.


Tribute by Doaly

I’ll never really understand why I was chosen to play Mr. Spock. In a metaphysical sense, there seemed to be a sort of inevitability involved…. When I was called to meet Gene Roddenberry, I assumed I was to be auditioned. I didn’t quite know how to react when I discovered that I was being “sold” on the role.
–LEONARD NIMOY

 

Computers make excellent and efficient servants, but I have no wish to serve under them.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “The Ultimate Computer”


Tribute by Dutch Uncle

Spock is definitely one of my best friends. When I put on those ears, it`s not like just another day. When I become Spock, that day becomes something special.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Without followers, evil cannot spread.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “And The Children Shall Lead”

 


Tribute by Nick Caldwell

You know, for a long time I have been of the opinion that artists don’t necessarily know what they’re doing. You don`t necessarily know what kind of universal concept you’re tapping into.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Change is the essential process of all existence.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “Let That Be Your Last Battlefield


Tribute by Andy Marlette

Art, if it is successful, needs no explanation. Star Trek and Spock, if they are works of art, can be discussed. But finally the response comes in individual terms. Each viewer sees what is there for him, depending on his frame of reference.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Insufficient facts always invite danger.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “Space Seed”


Tribute by Francesco Francavilla

When you
let me take
I’m grateful.
When you
let me give
I’m blessed.
–LEONARD NIMOY

I have never understood the female capacity to avoid a direct answer to any question.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “This Side of Paradise”


Tribute by Kevin Tong

The miracle is this: the more we share the more we have.
–LEONARD NIMOY

I realize that command does have its fascination, even under circumstances such as these, but I neither enjoy the idea of command nor am I frightened of it. It simply exists, and I will do whatever logically needs to be done.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “The Galileo Seven”


Tribute by Artist Abe Lopez

Whatever I have given, I have gained.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Vulcans never bluff.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “The Doomsday Machine”


Tribute by Brian Kesinger

Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end.
–LEONARD NIMOY

It is curious how often you humans manage to obtain that which you do not want.
–SPOCK, Star Trek: The Original Series, “Errand of Mercy”


Tribute by Lord Mesa Art

I am not Spock. But given the choice, if I had to be someone else, I would be Spock. If someone said, “You can have the choice of being any other TV character every played,” I would choose Spock. I like him. I admire him. I respect him.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
–SPOCK, Star Trek (2009)


Tribute By Mainger

Live Long and Prosper.
–LEONARD NIMOY

Live Long and Prosper.
–Spock, Star Trek


Tribute by Matt Needle

I think it’s my adventure, my trip, my journey, and I guess my attitude is, let the chips fall where they may.
Leonard Nimoy

“Fascinating.”

-Spock, Star Trek


Tribute by NinjaInk

My folks came to U.S. as immigrants, aliens, and became citizens. I was born in Boston, a citizen, went to Hollywood and became an alien.
Leonard Nimoy

“Captain, you almost make me believe in luck.”
Spock, Star Trek


Tribute by Patrick Ballesteros

I think about myself as like an ocean liner that’s been going full speed for a long distance, and the captain pulls the throttle back all the way to ‘stop,’ but the ship doesn’t stop immediately, does it? It has its own momentum and it keeps on going, and I’m very flattered that people are still finding me useful.
Leonard Nimoy

“If I seem insensitive to what you’re going through, Captain, understand – it’s the way I am.”

Spock, Star Trek


Tribute by Rob Wilson

That is the exploration that awaits you! Not mapping stars and studying nebula, but charting the unknown possibilities of existence.
Leonard Nimoy

“May I say that I have not thoroughly enjoyed serving with Humans? I find their illogic and foolish emotions a constant irritant.”

Spock, Star Trek


Tribute by Peter Raccoon (Jason Wilkins)

A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP

Leonard Nimoy (His last tweet)

“Your logic was impeccable, Captain. We are in grave danger.”

Spock, Star Trek

Via We Geek Girls, Poster Spy, Brainy Quotes and Spock Quotes.

indexI Am Spock


Movie posters are my thing and passion.

The standard Hollywood release poster has a lot of restrictions imposed upon it that makes it tough to raise anything produced by a studio advertising department to the level of art. Placement of stars, directors and sometimes screenwriting credits are always negotiated by agents into the signed contract. Often a star would require that his face be centrally located and top billed, almost always at the uppermost left or right hand corner. Sure, some of these kinds of posters can be artful. Still, being artful doesn’t make it art.
It is hard for an ad person to be creative when they are dealing with these restrictions. Add time restraints and it’s no wonder most Hollywood release posters are hack jobs, showing the same thing in the same way over and over again. Most of the art work is contracted out to whoever can do it faster and in the most obvious way.

Back in the 60’s and 70’s when movies began to be seen more as both art and entertainment, movie posters started reflecting the switch. Bob Peake (posters for My Fair Lady, Camelot and Apocalypse Now) and Drew Struzan (Star Wars) were the fathers of a movie poster renaissance that went hand and hand with the rise of Hollywood’s New Wave of directors (Arthur Penn, Sam Peckinpah, Bob Rafelson, Francis Ford Coppola) and actors (Jack Nicholson, Dustin Hoffman, Peter and Jane Fonda, Dennis Hopper) that took their cues and style from European Auteur Cinema (Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Jacques Rivtette, Claude Chabrol, Eric Rohmer).
These were adult films for a mature audience that appreciated the depth of plots, the actors and themes, the whole artistry involved. Even the big event films like Lawrence of Arabia, My Fair Lady, Camelot, West Side Story were roadshow attractions that first played at Radio City Music or the local opera or concert venue for a limited reserve engagement before they were released at the local movie palace. These were shows were mom and dad got dressed up for and hired a babysitter for the night.

What then killed the Hollywood art poster? In a word, Jaws. The Steven Spielberg film launched the summer blockbuster. Universal smartly released the film with a PG rating and scheduled it right in the middle of semester breaks for High School and College. That 13-25 demographic not only loved Jaws, it devoured it over and over again, making the film the highest grossing movie ever at the time.

The blockbuster became the sole reason for making films for most major studios. Smaller films which catered to an adult audience fell by the wayside into unfavorable release dates and less theaters. If a film couldn’t make a profit in its first two weeks of release the studio would not release it. Never mind letting a small serious film find its audience via word of mouth and critics reviews and gaining a medium size profit after a one or two month run. It was all or nothing. The bigger the ad campaign the better. All that mattered was getting the right kind of Fannies in the seats in the least amount of time then letting repeat viewers generate extra box office chum.

The imitators that followed Jaws became a dull form of a much copied copy and the posters that promoted them started losing their edge and depth, started losing their art. Even the better action and adventure flicks like Star Wars and the Raiders of the Lost Ark series recycled bits and pieces of older movie serials. The directors and writers smashed them together into a mythology that made them appear new and shiny to the younger kids. Much of it was fun, a little bit of it was actually great and some of it was art. Drew Struzan was a master of making these posters for these newly old movies. His craft was deep enough to be art to the younger demographic that was now the majority ticket buyers.

The alternate art movie poster at its core is fan art. It is created by the artist fan with the talent and the vision to create and sell his/her vision of the film. Like most art it comes from a profound disgust for the current status quo.

The alternate movie poster artists are mostly an undisciplined lot by Hollywood standards, which is why most never made it as professional comic book artists or Hollywood animators. They just can’t draw the same thing over and over again. They just don’t have the patience for it.

They draw what they love—the horror and sci-fi flicks they grew up on and saw over and over again. It is different and sometimes it is deep and unique to be art rather than an expression of craft. That uniqueness takes their posters to the first step of becoming art. Their work is different and energetic enough to stand out.
There are a lot of artist who are on the edge of being very good in this collection of alternate movie posters for this year’s Academy Best Picture nominees. Orlando Arocena, Tomer Hanuka, and Malika Favre are my favorites. Favre in particular is developing a style that straddles the dividing line between pop art and high art. Her BAFTA posters for The Theory of Everything, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Games and Boyhood are balanced between maturity, light and shade and illuminated in a way that hints at the layers just underneath.

Only experience, seeing more movies, both eye candy and brain candy, or ideally ones that merge the two, is keeping them from true greatness. If they want to be a truly great artist they must make the leap away from fan art and the need to draw what they love to drawing what they see and feel, know and understand completely in a physical, intellectual and emotional sense.
Here is an interesting statistic that illustrates my point. Of the twenty-seven pieces in this collection only about five or six were drawn well before the Academy nominations were announced. The visual splendor of The Grand Budapest Hotel enchanted the most artists. Selma inspired the least. If you go the artist’s website you’ll find that for every serious foreign or independent movie drawn there are at least twenty more for horror, fantasy, action and sci-fi.

American Sniper by Colin Morella
American Sniper by Colin Morella

http://noble–6.deviantart.com/

American Sniper by Orlando Arocena
American Sniper by Orlando Arocena

https://www.behance.net/orlandoarocena

American Sniper by Kathy Cho
American Sniper by Kathy Cho
Birdman by We Buy Your Kids
Birdman by We Buy Your Kids

http://www.wbyk.com.au/

Birdman by Malika Favre
Birdman by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

Birdman by Harijs Grundmanis
Birdman by Harijs Grundmanis

http://www.harrymovieart.com/

Birdman by Odes Roberts
Birdman by Odes Roberts
Boyhood by Tomer Hanuka
Boyhood by Tomer Hanuka

http://www.thanuka.com/index.php

Boyhood by Malika Favre
Boyhood by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

Boyhood by Greta Skagerlind
Boyhood by Greta Skagerlind

http://www.gskagerlind.com/

Boyhoodr by Cristin Burton
Boyhoodr by Cristin Burton
Selma by Nichole Garcia
Selma by Nichole Garcia
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Malika Favre
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gregory Sacre
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gregory Sacre

http://gokaiju.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Peter Strain
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Peter Strain

http://www.peterstrain.co.uk/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista

http://gianbautista.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista

http://gianbautista.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Thomas Walker
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Thomas Walker

https://www.behance.net/tommypocket

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Harijs Grundmanis
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Harijs Grundmanis

http://www.harrymovieart.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Carisa Tong
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Carisa Tong
The Imitation Game by Malika Favre
The Imitation Game by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Imitation Game by Bryant Nichols
The Imitation Game by Bryant Nichols
The Theory of Everything by Malika Favre
The Theory of Everything by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Theory of Everything by Deanna Paquette
The Theory of Everything by Deanna Paquette
Whiplash by Neven Udovicic
Whiplash by Neven Udovicic

https://www.behance.net/geminianum

Whiplash by Simon Postle
Whiplash by Simon Postle
Whiplash by Jordan Roland
Whiplash by Jordan Roland

Via AlternativeMoviePosters.com.

indexBest Pictures Movie Posters


Chappie

When Chappie, the latest film from Neil Blomkamp (District 9, Elysium) coming out March 6th, starts to get a community art project from the Poster Posse, you know its a sign that the first event film of the year has arrived.

There is something about this robot built from mismatched contiguous pieces of clinking clanking junk that resonates with this artist coalition.

Perhaps it is the way this scrap bucket bucket of a movie built from recycled A.I. movie plots and themes resonates with the various artistic styles that make up the Poster Posse?

Maybe it is because Chappie was raised by a local gang? Like them, a gang of no goods and outcasts who find the chance in this little naive box of bolts (or brushes and pixels in the Poster Posse case) to be the good father they never had and do the good works that their talents can let them achieve.

Hey, art is to a certain extent about seeing and presenting old things in new ways.

No one complained but everyone cried, when Steven Spielberg essentially did the same thing with E.T.

The Poster Posse released this project in two phases. All of the art is combined in the collection below.


Andy Fairhurst


Arian Novier


Ben McLeod


Ben Whitesell


Brian Taylor AKA CandyKiller


Daniel Nash


Fernando Reza


John Hughes


Kaz Oomori


Kaz Oomori Japanese Variant


Laurie Greasley “Public Trust”


Luke Butland


Luke Butland (Variant)


Matt Needle


Orlando Arocena


Rich Davies


Salvadore Anguiano Overdrive Edition


Salvador Anguiano


Sam Ho


Simon Delart


Stephen Sampson AKA The Dark Inker


Tim Anderson


Chappie Theatrical Poster

Via Poster Posse

indexChappie: The Art of the Movie


 

What do you do if you are a Disney Romantic without a single shred of artistic talent and you have a girlfriend that is a Disney Princess in your eyes? You hire a good artist to turn her and you into the perfect Disney couple. That is exactly what Brian Flynn did when he went searching for an artist capable and willing to create himself and his gf Manini Gupta into the perfect version of well-known Disney animated couples: Ariel and Eric, Aladdin and Jasmine, Belle and the Beast, Rapunzel and Flynn Rider, Mulan and Captain Li Shang.

Flynn (no relation, except imaginary, to the other Flynn in Rapunzel) found the perfect visionary in Dylan Bonner, a recently graduated Illustration major and Visual Development minor of the Ringling College of Art and Design. Bonner’s portfolio and blog posts are crammed with Disney Princess fan art, fairy tale heroines drawn in cutesy ways, and a special love for Audrey Hepburn films. The perfect combination of talent in Flynn’s eyes.

Flynn explained in an interview posted on Bored Panda:

“I want our relationship to be as epic and timeless as the animations we grew up on, so I decided to have us painted into some famous Disney scenes and surprise her for Valentines Day,” Flynn beamed on Imgur. “It’s been a secret for 3 months, and I can’t wait to show her!“

Bonner was excited about the secret project as well; “I feel very lucky to have done these, especially after reading her say that girls like her didn’t always get to identify with a Disney princess and I seriously love that I got to change that!“

The results, which can be seen below are pretty marvelous.

Gupta as Ariel
Gupta as Ariel
Gupta in real life
Gupta in real life
Flynn and Gupta in real life.
Flynn and Gupta in real life.
Gupta as Belle
Gupta as Belle
Gupta and Flynn as Jasmine and Aladdin
Gupta and Flynn as Jasmine and Aladdin
Flynn and Gupta as Eric and Ariel
Flynn and Gupta as Eric and Ariel
Gupta and Flynn as Mulan and Li Shang
Gupta and Flynn as Mulan and Li Shang
Flynn and Gupta as the other Flynn and Rapunzel
Flynn and Gupta as the other Flynn and Rapunzel

Via Bored Panda.

You can see more of Dylan Bonner’s work at his blog.

51qIbbtv9bL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_

The St. Valentine Day Quiz Game Book: Mystery And History Challenge For Sweethearts Of All Ages (Holiday Quiz Books: Facts And Fun For Kids Of All Ages Book 3)


 

Gender Swapping animated and comic book characters has been the new trend in fan art for a cycle now. The Disney Princesses were the last to get gender bent. Now there is even a new rule for it. Rule 63 states that for any female character, there exists art of a male version of the character, and vice versa.

Ming Doyle, a freelance illustrator, comic book artist, and self-imagined replicant, decided to take Rule 63 one step further. Doyle gender swapped famous DC comic book superheroes and villains with well known celebrities. Among the mix Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne and the Joker, Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson, and Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor.

Doyle even got other fellow artists– Lauren Moran, Joe Quinones, Jordan Gibson and Erica Henderson (many of them professional comic book illustrators) to join in the fun. The collection can be found under the Tumblr hashtag #DCBend.

The results are pretty fetching.

Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne by MingDoyle
Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne by MingDoyle
Geena Davis as the Joker by Ming Doyle
Geena Davis as the Joker by Ming Doyle
Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor by Ming Doyle
Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor by Ming Doyle
Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson by Ming Doyle
Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson by Ming Doyle
Jena Malone as The Flash by Joe Quinones
Jena Malone as The Flash by Joe Quinones
Rachel Weisz as Two Face by Joe Quinones
Rachel Weisz as Two Face by Joe Quinones
Jennifer Connelly as Clark Kent by Joe  Quinones
Jennifer Connelly as Clark Kent by Joe Quinones
Helen Mirren as Commish Gordon by Jordan Gibson
Helen Mirren as Commish Gordon by Jordan Gibson
Janelle Monáe as the Music Meister by Jordan Gibson
Janelle Monáe as the Music Meister by Jordan Gibson
Nicki Minaj as The Creeper by Jordan Gibson
Nicki Minaj as The Creeper by Jordan Gibson
Charlize Theron as Aquaman by Jordan Gibson
Charlize Theron as Aquaman by Jordan Gibson
Daniel Henney as Cassandra Cain by Erica Henderson
Daniel Henney as Cassandra Cain by Erica Henderson
Ed Asner as Granny Goodness by Erica Henderson
Ed Asner as Granny Goodness by Erica Henderson
Joan Chen as Ra’s Al Ghul by Erica Henderson
Joan Chen as Ra’s Al Ghul by Erica Henderson
Winona Ryder as Superboy by Erica Henderson
Winona Ryder as Superboy by Erica Henderson
Tilda Swinton as Mr Freeze by Erica Henderson
Tilda Swinton as Mr Freeze by Erica Henderson
David Bowie as Poison Ivy by Erica Henderson
David Bowie as Poison Ivy by Erica Henderson
Matt Bomer as Wonder Woman by Lauren Moran
Matt Bomer as Wonder Woman by Lauren Moran
Lupita Nyong’o as Martian Manhunter by Lauren Moran
Lupita Nyong’o as Martian Manhunter by Lauren Moran
Gerard Way as Raven by Lauren Moran
Gerard Way as Raven by Lauren Moran

Via IO9

indexDC Comics: A Visual History