Archive for February, 2015


Movie posters are my thing and passion.

The standard Hollywood release poster has a lot of restrictions imposed upon it that makes it tough to raise anything produced by a studio advertising department to the level of art. Placement of stars, directors and sometimes screenwriting credits are always negotiated by agents into the signed contract. Often a star would require that his face be centrally located and top billed, almost always at the uppermost left or right hand corner. Sure, some of these kinds of posters can be artful. Still, being artful doesn’t make it art.
It is hard for an ad person to be creative when they are dealing with these restrictions. Add time restraints and it’s no wonder most Hollywood release posters are hack jobs, showing the same thing in the same way over and over again. Most of the art work is contracted out to whoever can do it faster and in the most obvious way.

Back in the 60’s and 70’s when movies began to be seen more as both art and entertainment, movie posters started reflecting the switch. Bob Peake (posters for My Fair Lady, Camelot and Apocalypse Now) and Drew Struzan (Star Wars) were the fathers of a movie poster renaissance that went hand and hand with the rise of Hollywood’s New Wave of directors (Arthur Penn, Sam Peckinpah, Bob Rafelson, Francis Ford Coppola) and actors (Jack Nicholson, Dustin Hoffman, Peter and Jane Fonda, Dennis Hopper) that took their cues and style from European Auteur Cinema (Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Jacques Rivtette, Claude Chabrol, Eric Rohmer).
These were adult films for a mature audience that appreciated the depth of plots, the actors and themes, the whole artistry involved. Even the big event films like Lawrence of Arabia, My Fair Lady, Camelot, West Side Story were roadshow attractions that first played at Radio City Music or the local opera or concert venue for a limited reserve engagement before they were released at the local movie palace. These were shows were mom and dad got dressed up for and hired a babysitter for the night.

What then killed the Hollywood art poster? In a word, Jaws. The Steven Spielberg film launched the summer blockbuster. Universal smartly released the film with a PG rating and scheduled it right in the middle of semester breaks for High School and College. That 13-25 demographic not only loved Jaws, it devoured it over and over again, making the film the highest grossing movie ever at the time.

The blockbuster became the sole reason for making films for most major studios. Smaller films which catered to an adult audience fell by the wayside into unfavorable release dates and less theaters. If a film couldn’t make a profit in its first two weeks of release the studio would not release it. Never mind letting a small serious film find its audience via word of mouth and critics reviews and gaining a medium size profit after a one or two month run. It was all or nothing. The bigger the ad campaign the better. All that mattered was getting the right kind of Fannies in the seats in the least amount of time then letting repeat viewers generate extra box office chum.

The imitators that followed Jaws became a dull form of a much copied copy and the posters that promoted them started losing their edge and depth, started losing their art. Even the better action and adventure flicks like Star Wars and the Raiders of the Lost Ark series recycled bits and pieces of older movie serials. The directors and writers smashed them together into a mythology that made them appear new and shiny to the younger kids. Much of it was fun, a little bit of it was actually great and some of it was art. Drew Struzan was a master of making these posters for these newly old movies. His craft was deep enough to be art to the younger demographic that was now the majority ticket buyers.

The alternate art movie poster at its core is fan art. It is created by the artist fan with the talent and the vision to create and sell his/her vision of the film. Like most art it comes from a profound disgust for the current status quo.

The alternate movie poster artists are mostly an undisciplined lot by Hollywood standards, which is why most never made it as professional comic book artists or Hollywood animators. They just can’t draw the same thing over and over again. They just don’t have the patience for it.

They draw what they love—the horror and sci-fi flicks they grew up on and saw over and over again. It is different and sometimes it is deep and unique to be art rather than an expression of craft. That uniqueness takes their posters to the first step of becoming art. Their work is different and energetic enough to stand out.
There are a lot of artist who are on the edge of being very good in this collection of alternate movie posters for this year’s Academy Best Picture nominees. Orlando Arocena, Tomer Hanuka, and Malika Favre are my favorites. Favre in particular is developing a style that straddles the dividing line between pop art and high art. Her BAFTA posters for The Theory of Everything, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Games and Boyhood are balanced between maturity, light and shade and illuminated in a way that hints at the layers just underneath.

Only experience, seeing more movies, both eye candy and brain candy, or ideally ones that merge the two, is keeping them from true greatness. If they want to be a truly great artist they must make the leap away from fan art and the need to draw what they love to drawing what they see and feel, know and understand completely in a physical, intellectual and emotional sense.
Here is an interesting statistic that illustrates my point. Of the twenty-seven pieces in this collection only about five or six were drawn well before the Academy nominations were announced. The visual splendor of The Grand Budapest Hotel enchanted the most artists. Selma inspired the least. If you go the artist’s website you’ll find that for every serious foreign or independent movie drawn there are at least twenty more for horror, fantasy, action and sci-fi.

American Sniper by Colin Morella
American Sniper by Colin Morella

http://noble–6.deviantart.com/

American Sniper by Orlando Arocena
American Sniper by Orlando Arocena

https://www.behance.net/orlandoarocena

American Sniper by Kathy Cho
American Sniper by Kathy Cho
Birdman by We Buy Your Kids
Birdman by We Buy Your Kids

http://www.wbyk.com.au/

Birdman by Malika Favre
Birdman by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

Birdman by Harijs Grundmanis
Birdman by Harijs Grundmanis

http://www.harrymovieart.com/

Birdman by Odes Roberts
Birdman by Odes Roberts
Boyhood by Tomer Hanuka
Boyhood by Tomer Hanuka

http://www.thanuka.com/index.php

Boyhood by Malika Favre
Boyhood by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

Boyhood by Greta Skagerlind
Boyhood by Greta Skagerlind

http://www.gskagerlind.com/

Boyhoodr by Cristin Burton
Boyhoodr by Cristin Burton
Selma by Nichole Garcia
Selma by Nichole Garcia
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Malika Favre
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gregory Sacre
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gregory Sacre

http://gokaiju.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Peter Strain
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Peter Strain

http://www.peterstrain.co.uk/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista

http://gianbautista.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Gian Bautista

http://gianbautista.tumblr.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Thomas Walker
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Thomas Walker

https://www.behance.net/tommypocket

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Harijs Grundmanis
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Harijs Grundmanis

http://www.harrymovieart.com/

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Carisa Tong
The Grand Budapest Hotel by Carisa Tong
The Imitation Game by Malika Favre
The Imitation Game by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Imitation Game by Bryant Nichols
The Imitation Game by Bryant Nichols
The Theory of Everything by Malika Favre
The Theory of Everything by Malika Favre

http://www.malikafavre.com/

The Theory of Everything by Deanna Paquette
The Theory of Everything by Deanna Paquette
Whiplash by Neven Udovicic
Whiplash by Neven Udovicic

https://www.behance.net/geminianum

Whiplash by Simon Postle
Whiplash by Simon Postle
Whiplash by Jordan Roland
Whiplash by Jordan Roland

Via AlternativeMoviePosters.com.

indexBest Pictures Movie Posters


Chappie

When Chappie, the latest film from Neil Blomkamp (District 9, Elysium) coming out March 6th, starts to get a community art project from the Poster Posse, you know its a sign that the first event film of the year has arrived.

There is something about this robot built from mismatched contiguous pieces of clinking clanking junk that resonates with this artist coalition.

Perhaps it is the way this scrap bucket bucket of a movie built from recycled A.I. movie plots and themes resonates with the various artistic styles that make up the Poster Posse?

Maybe it is because Chappie was raised by a local gang? Like them, a gang of no goods and outcasts who find the chance in this little naive box of bolts (or brushes and pixels in the Poster Posse case) to be the good father they never had and do the good works that their talents can let them achieve.

Hey, art is to a certain extent about seeing and presenting old things in new ways.

No one complained but everyone cried, when Steven Spielberg essentially did the same thing with E.T.

The Poster Posse released this project in two phases. All of the art is combined in the collection below.

Andy Fairhurst

Arian Novier

Ben McLeod

Ben Whitesell

Brian Taylor AKA CandyKiller

Daniel Nash

Fernando Reza

John Hughes

Kaz Oomori

Kaz Oomori Japanese Variant

Laurie Greasley “Public Trust”

Luke Butland

Luke Butland (Variant)

Matt Needle

Orlando Arocena

Rich Davies

Salvadore Anguiano Overdrive Edition

Salvador Anguiano

Sam Ho

Simon Delart

Stephen Sampson AKA The Dark Inker

Tim Anderson

Chappie Theatrical Poster

Via Poster Posse

indexChappie: The Art of the Movie


 

What do you do if you are a Disney Romantic without a single shred of artistic talent and you have a girlfriend that is a Disney Princess in your eyes? You hire a good artist to turn her and you into the perfect Disney couple. That is exactly what Brian Flynn did when he went searching for an artist capable and willing to create himself and his gf Manini Gupta into the perfect version of well-known Disney animated couples: Ariel and Eric, Aladdin and Jasmine, Belle and the Beast, Rapunzel and Flynn Rider, Mulan and Captain Li Shang.

Flynn (no relation, except imaginary, to the other Flynn in Rapunzel) found the perfect visionary in Dylan Bonner, a recently graduated Illustration major and Visual Development minor of the Ringling College of Art and Design. Bonner’s portfolio and blog posts are crammed with Disney Princess fan art, fairy tale heroines drawn in cutesy ways, and a special love for Audrey Hepburn films. The perfect combination of talent in Flynn’s eyes.

Flynn explained in an interview posted on Bored Panda:

“I want our relationship to be as epic and timeless as the animations we grew up on, so I decided to have us painted into some famous Disney scenes and surprise her for Valentines Day,” Flynn beamed on Imgur. “It’s been a secret for 3 months, and I can’t wait to show her!“

Bonner was excited about the secret project as well; “I feel very lucky to have done these, especially after reading her say that girls like her didn’t always get to identify with a Disney princess and I seriously love that I got to change that!“

The results, which can be seen below are pretty marvelous.

Gupta as Ariel
Gupta as Ariel
Gupta in real life
Gupta in real life
Flynn and Gupta in real life.
Flynn and Gupta in real life.
Gupta as Belle
Gupta as Belle
Gupta and Flynn as Jasmine and Aladdin
Gupta and Flynn as Jasmine and Aladdin
Flynn and Gupta as Eric and Ariel
Flynn and Gupta as Eric and Ariel
Gupta and Flynn as Mulan and Li Shang
Gupta and Flynn as Mulan and Li Shang
Flynn and Gupta as the other Flynn and Rapunzel
Flynn and Gupta as the other Flynn and Rapunzel

Via Bored Panda.

You can see more of Dylan Bonner’s work at his blog.

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The St. Valentine Day Quiz Game Book: Mystery And History Challenge For Sweethearts Of All Ages (Holiday Quiz Books: Facts And Fun For Kids Of All Ages Book 3)


 

Gender Swapping animated and comic book characters has been the new trend in fan art for a cycle now. The Disney Princesses were the last to get gender bent. Now there is even a new rule for it. Rule 63 states that for any female character, there exists art of a male version of the character, and vice versa.

Ming Doyle, a freelance illustrator, comic book artist, and self-imagined replicant, decided to take Rule 63 one step further. Doyle gender swapped famous DC comic book superheroes and villains with well known celebrities. Among the mix Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne and the Joker, Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson, and Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor.

Doyle even got other fellow artists– Lauren Moran, Joe Quinones, Jordan Gibson and Erica Henderson (many of them professional comic book illustrators) to join in the fun. The collection can be found under the Tumblr hashtag #DCBend.

The results are pretty fetching.

Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne by MingDoyle
Geena Davis as Bruce Wayne by MingDoyle
Geena Davis as the Joker by Ming Doyle
Geena Davis as the Joker by Ming Doyle
Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor by Ming Doyle
Gillian Anderson as Lex Luthor by Ming Doyle
Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson by Ming Doyle
Winona Ryder as Dick Grayson by Ming Doyle
Jena Malone as The Flash by Joe Quinones
Jena Malone as The Flash by Joe Quinones
Rachel Weisz as Two Face by Joe Quinones
Rachel Weisz as Two Face by Joe Quinones
Jennifer Connelly as Clark Kent by Joe  Quinones
Jennifer Connelly as Clark Kent by Joe Quinones
Helen Mirren as Commish Gordon by Jordan Gibson
Helen Mirren as Commish Gordon by Jordan Gibson
Janelle Monáe as the Music Meister by Jordan Gibson
Janelle Monáe as the Music Meister by Jordan Gibson
Nicki Minaj as The Creeper by Jordan Gibson
Nicki Minaj as The Creeper by Jordan Gibson
Charlize Theron as Aquaman by Jordan Gibson
Charlize Theron as Aquaman by Jordan Gibson
Daniel Henney as Cassandra Cain by Erica Henderson
Daniel Henney as Cassandra Cain by Erica Henderson
Ed Asner as Granny Goodness by Erica Henderson
Ed Asner as Granny Goodness by Erica Henderson
Joan Chen as Ra’s Al Ghul by Erica Henderson
Joan Chen as Ra’s Al Ghul by Erica Henderson
Winona Ryder as Superboy by Erica Henderson
Winona Ryder as Superboy by Erica Henderson
Tilda Swinton as Mr Freeze by Erica Henderson
Tilda Swinton as Mr Freeze by Erica Henderson
David Bowie as Poison Ivy by Erica Henderson
David Bowie as Poison Ivy by Erica Henderson
Matt Bomer as Wonder Woman by Lauren Moran
Matt Bomer as Wonder Woman by Lauren Moran
Lupita Nyong’o as Martian Manhunter by Lauren Moran
Lupita Nyong’o as Martian Manhunter by Lauren Moran
Gerard Way as Raven by Lauren Moran
Gerard Way as Raven by Lauren Moran

Via IO9

indexDC Comics: A Visual History


Everyone who loves the movies is essentially a photo lover at heart. Whether it’s 24 frames per second or 1 frame forever the clearly lit and well shot single image captures a solitary place in the light echoes of our hearts and minds.

Nothing will make you think more about the world we live in then a fabulous photo.

We don’t often get to see the face that took them, just the image that earned that fame and some measure of immortality for their taker. Tell me what Matthew Brady looked like or Ansel Adams or Alfred Stieglitz? Not easy to do? Yet everyone knows a Brady Civil War photo, an Adams Mountain Black and White, a Stieglitz Street Scene and City scape when they see it.

Tim Mantoani aims to correct that. Mantoani lugged around a Polaroid Professional Instant Camera and took self-portraits of photographers holding their most famous image. He captured over 150 portraits.

That is quite a Herculean feat in itself. Add to that the fact the camera Mantoani used weighs over 235 pounds and is rolled around on its own custom wheeled tripod and it becomes even more mythic and impressive. The 20 X 24 Polaroid produces plates of 20 inches by 24 (appr. 50cm x 60cm).

You can buy the collection at Amazon at the link below:

Behind Photographs: Archiving Photographic Legends – Slipcase Edition

Via Bored Panda.

Steve McCurry – Girl In Afghanistan

Steve McCurry: Peshawar, Pakistan 1984. I looked for this girl for 17 years and finally found her in 2002. Her name is Sharbat Gula.

Jeff Widener – Beijing 1989

Jeff Widener – Beijing 1989

Harry Benson – The Beatles

Harry Benson: Brian Epstein – Beatles Manager – had just told them they were number one in America – and I was coming with them to New York. 1964

Lyle Owerko – 9/11

Lyle Owerko: No one knew such beautiful warm day would serve as the backdrop to one of the most painful and confusing events to the heart of mankind. This picture is one small part of such a huge event that ties the threads of thousands of stories and millions of people together. Written words will never convey the whole scope of the event, nor summarize the sounds, the smells or even voices that are frozen in my memory bank from that day. I did the best job I could in photographing the 9/11 so that future generations would have the idea of the scope of what happened, to have the evidence how innocence can so easily be snatched away in a razor’s edged moment in time. My hope is that in time the wounds and pain will heal and that wisdom and peace will prevail among the darkness of this event, so that humanity could move forward into a time of grace and understanding.

Marry Ellen Mark – Ringmaster With Elephant

Marry Ellen Mark: I am holding my photograph of Ram Prakash Singh and his beloved elephant Shyama – taken in 1990. Ram Prakash Singh was the ringmaster of “The Great Golden Circus” – this photograph was done in Ahmedabad, India – This was part of my Indian Circus Project. I love India and I love the circus, so photographing eighteen circuses all around India was an incredible experience. Unfortunately Shyama died a few months after this photograph was taken – supposedly, he succumbed to poisoned chapatti – Ram Prakash Singh was heartbroken – me also.

Thomas Mangelsen – Brown bear

Thomas Mangelsen: Brown bear, Brooks Falls Katmai National Park, Alaska. July 1988. I pre-visualized this possibility (of an image like this) from watching documentary films about the bears at Katmai and seeing a photograph in Alaska Air Magazine of a group of bears here at the falls. At the time, I was on a flight to Anchorage working on a documentary film about Sandhill Cranes and had a week between shoots. I phoned the park headquarters from the airport in Achorage and asked about getting a campsite. They said they were all full – except for one site, that was near the bear trail and nobody wanted it. I told them I would take it. I spent a week on a small platform above the falls trying to captures this image. I would go most days before sunrise and stay until dark. During that time I shot 35 rolls of film of pretty much just head + shoulders of bears + sockeye salmon leaping the falls. Six weeks later I opened the yellow box to see this image. It was a nice surprise. I hadn’t known that I got it.

David Doubilet – Circle Of Barracuda

David Doubilet: Circle of Barracuda, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. The school of chevron barracudas circled the diver three times and pow they were gone into a dark afternoon sea. The oceans of the world have no straight lines; geometry like a perfect circle is a rare thing, but these barracudas will do this as a defense. 70% of our planet is an ocean. It is a place of infinite hidden beauty. It is a place where light behaves in a very different manner. Global warming/ climate change is about water. Coral reefs where I have spent most of my life are very threatened now—not just from rising temperatures but from the change in ocean chemistry = This is a world where my partner Jennifer Hayes and I go into. It is most of our planet. A world without corners that may be gone by the end of the century.

May Pang – John Lennon

May Pang: Summer 1974 Long Island Sound NY. A relaxing time with his son Julian. I called this photo “Family Portrait”

Meil Leifer – Ali vs. Liston

Neil Leifer: Ali vs. Liston – May 25, 1965, Lewiston, Maine

Vincent Laforet – Me And My Human

Vincent Laforet: I’ve been fortunate enough to witness some pretty amazing things in my relatively young career that began twenty years ago. Many were beautiful, others were horrifying; most were important moments in history every event big or small is important. One of the interesting things that I’ve learned through aerial photography is that taking a step backwards (or in this case 1,500 feet up) ironically often forces the view to become much more intimate with the image as they study it in much greater detail, and are forced to let their imagination take over. “Me and my human” Central Park, NYC

Bob Gruen – John Lennon

Bob Gruen: John Lennon asked me to come to his pentouse apt. on the east side of New York to take pictures for the cover of his ‘Walls + Bridges’ album. After we took a series of portraits for the record cover we took some informal shots to use for publicity. I asked him if he still had the New York City t-shirt I had given him a year earlier and he went a put it on and we made this photo.

Elliott Erwitt – Two Dogs With Owner

Elliott Erwitt: The picture I am holding was snapped in 1974 just across the street from my apartment in New York’s Central Park. It has been 38 years since that event and sadly I have lost track of the participants.

Lori Grinker – Mike Tyson

Lori Grinker: Mike Tyson – 1980, age 14. I began a project on young boxers when I was a student. The legendary Cus D’Amato told me Mike would be the next great heavy weight champion, he was right – and I continued on with him for nearly a decade. He was a trouble but sweet kid who veered off the good path he was led to with all that comes with being a celebrity in that world.

Nick Ut – Napalm Attack In Vietnam

Nick Ut: June 8, 1972 Trang Bang Village Kim Phuc 9 year-old girl South Vietnam drop napalm in her village.

Herman Leonard – Jazz Musicians

Herman Leonard: It was early 1948 at the Royal Roost in New York. An afternoon rehearsal gave me a unique opportunity to photograph many giants of jazz with my trusty 4×5 Speed Graphic. What a great career! To do what you love and be entertained at the same time!

Douglas Kirkland – Marilyn Monroe

Douglas Kirkland: This is from my Evening with Marilyn

Carl Fischer – Muhammad Ali

Carl Fischer: Muhammad Ali, New York, 1967

index

Behind Photographs: Archiving Photographic Legends – Slipcase Edition


There is a special yearning in the artist known as 100% Soft (AKA Truck Torrence) to make everything small, soft, cute and squishy. Maybe he is doing a sly nod to the child-like nature of his often comic source? His genre is definitely sci-fi, fantasy and action adventure: Big Trouble in Little China, Ghostbusters, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Lost, Avengers, Kill Bill and others like it. Hard dramas, deep foreign films and torrid romances don’t make it to his art. If it is not wildly pop it is not in his art.

Gallery 1988 in Los Angeles will be hosting a 100% Soft solo show titled “Mass Hysteria” that will run from today until the end of the month.

The artist statement for the show explains why he draws the stuff he does:

Well the simple answer is, I just like drawing cute stuff and these are the movies I love.
I’ve always loved genre and cult film. I basically grew up watching Big Trouble in Little China and Repo Man on repeat. It’s really fun to translate some of those characters into something that is the polar opposite of their foundation but still maintains their characteristics. I think there’s something fun about being able to look at some of these drawings and maybe not understand what you’re seeing at first, but then realize you’re looking at O-Ren Ishii from Kill Bill with her scalp sliced off. I hope this doesn’t mean I’m a sociopath.

For more of 100% Soft’s work visit his website.

Avengers
Avengers
Big Trouble in Little China
Big Trouble in Little China
Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Piece
Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Piece
Kill Bill
Kill Bill
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Raiders of the Lost Ark
The Bad Guys, Villains, Miscreant and Low Life Camp
The Bad Guys, Villains, Miscreant and Low Life Camp
The Good Guys, Heroes, Underdogs, Hot Shots Picnic
The Good Guys, Heroes, Underdogs, Hot Shots Picnic

index

Crazy 4 Cult: Cult Movie Art 2


 

 

What would be Valentine’s Day be without saying what you like about the one you love. Another day watching porn by yourself for some. Solo efforts for others. A Triple feature of Romantic comedies for everyone else.

So let’s all be grateful that what he have someone to go to the movies and share your treats with.

And if the one you love is a true movie Geek, you say I love you with a movie themed Valentine’s Day card.

Digital artist, greeting card designer and writer PJ McQuade has come up with 11 Valentine’s that say I love at 24 frames per second or 48 fps if you are a High Definition cineaste and lover.

All are cool and make great snuggle films with a bowl of popcorn and some 50 Shades of Gray going-ons afterwards.

You can go to McQuade’s Etsy store to buy them.

Brick from Anchorman

Brick says what is in your heart… almost.

George McFly from Back to the Future

George McFly knows the physics of love

Gollum from The Lord of the Rings

Gollum knows what “Precious” is all about

Hodor from Game of Thrones

Hodor is almost as cute as “I am Groot”

Quint from Jaws

Watch it…this just might be shark bait.

Lando Calrissian from Star Wars

A sentiment E.T. might be thinking too

Lord of Darkness from Legend

Yep, the Hell it is

Clarence and Alabama from True Romance

Aint it so true.

Khan from Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan

Love is a dish best served cold, hot, & very heart

Darth Vader from Star Wars

Whoa Belle… don’t go for that Beast!

Yoda from Star Wars

Can’t say Star Wars love with out a Space-a-gram

Do I do what you do when you do that thing to me

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Quotes of Love: Magical Love Quotes from the Movies – Timeless Romantic Hollywood Quotes to Make That Special Person Fall in Love With You Again…Or For the First Time! (Valentines Day Romance)